About your Search

20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
to the president about past conflicts over the deficit reduction. mark and i were talking about how far back we go. it is a few years. and i remembered him of the earlier sessions that we had. gramm-rudman one and two and gran member holland. i've googled it for all of them. and i was thinking there have been two major changes. number one is the dataset that is clearly much greater. the deficit is much greater. when i think of the ways and means committee, would change their has been in the composition. the ranking member at a time when i started went to the world bank. i worked with bill on trade. he was handling the tax material mainly. and bill was working on health care at the time. i think a second major change is very much effective today and affects us today. it is this change in composition of the republican party. i think it has moved very much more to the right. i think that makes it very difficult to handle the problems that we have before us. let me comment briefly on where we are. you offer the president yesterday. we have had spending cuts of a trillion and a half dollars. it comes f
industry and manufacturing. the second on deficit reform, and the third on improving government performance. the participants here today include brookings scholars, outside experts, and private sector representatives and leaders. our discussions will reflect a lot of the research that goes on here at brookings, and you will be able to find a number of examples of that research outside the auditorium where you came in. my recommended particular, the work of our metropolitan program on ideas on how to revitalize manufacturing, and also the work of art government studies program on how to make innovation-based economy. the growth through innovation project is an example of what we're doing increasingly here at brookings, and that is undertaking both research and public events and outreach that draw from multiple programs of research pro-guns here at the institution. and we have three of our research programs represented here today. the growth through innovation project is led inside a brookings by darrell west of our government studies program, bruce katz, of our metropolitan program of our ec
house caprettto prioritize the government's bills. guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake a deficit-reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a dead beat nation, really. i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know firsthand, second-hand, but much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, some of them realize the potential consequences. host: if president obama won on the fiscal cliff d
important thing he could do is tax reform and deficit control. if he could put those two things together, that'd be bigger than health care. >> steve: you know what? if he were to work with the republicans talking reform-- >> i think that's a lock for next year. >> steve: well, he wants to do something about it. some republicans want to do something about it, remember last time with health care, the republicans had a bunch of ideas and the democrats shut them out completely. maybe this time bipartisan. >> brian: that's not the harry reid i know. >> alisyn: let's get to other stories in the headlines, late last noos night, two drones strikes, at least three of the bodies were burned beyond recognition. the death toll could rise in the hostage crisis at a gas plant in algeria. many were killed including one american. two americans are still missing and the crisis ended yesterday when the aerian army attacked the plant killing two militants. president obama said this is attack is another reminder of the threat posed by al-qaeda and other violent extremist groups in north africa. and the pre
to prioritize the government's bills. what's wrong with that idea? guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake deficit reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills do you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a deadbeat nation really, and i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know, if i might say so, if not firsthand, secondhand, much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, not all of it, i think some realizes the potential consequences. host: if
veer -- inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put at a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to dig out of that. it is very difficult for organizations, especially in a crisis response, to think about just releasing the information before it's asked for and remove that deficit. i've been involved in several situations where the information was available and the information was understandable and probably mitigated some of the concerns, but because of the way the companies in the government work, it was difficult to make that transparent and then catching up with that with the american public is really, really difficult. nancy and marcia, we had talked about this with jay a lot. one of the problems we have in mental anguishing impacts -- measuring the impacts of the spill in the gulf is the lack of the background of the presence of hydrocarbons as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. in the context of moving beyond the direct aims of the research that's going to be conducted with the bp money, what do you think the lar
. that california is nowhere near balancing the budget. they have had multibillion-dollar deficits in the past. what i like to do, some of my friends who don't believe taxes matter including the guy in the white house, i say if you don't think taxes matter and affect behavior, explain to me, bill, why it is there has been about 500,000 new jobs over the last 10 years created in texas with no income tax and where california lost about 500,000 jobs? there is lot of factors but i think taxes are one of them. bill: 13% for california. if that is the case they leapfrogged hawaii. matt, give you the last point. if bobby jindal gets his way do folks in louisiana have a better chance at tracking jobs? >> absolutely yes. look at call to, what jerry brown is doing is short-term fix. bringing money by increasing taxes but the long-term effect jobs will leave, people will leave and hurt the economy long term. bill: matt, thank you. steve moore, thank you as well. e-mail is hemmer@foxnews.com. viewers on home on twitter that follow me, @billhemmer, file your one word, not one word, one line. martha: one word is
a fifth year in a row where we are going to have a deficit exceeding a trillion dollars a year. that's the greatest threat to the middle class in america and we are committed to trying to address that problem. that's one of the reasons why i voted against the fiscal cliff deal. the president called for a balanced approach. i think his approach raising taxes is not the way to grow our economy. nonetheless, he indicated there would be spending cuts. there were not. in fact there were spending increases in that bill. host: fix boxer's original assault gun ban. echoing a recent poll that said 30% of those polled are dissatisfied with gun laws, want to see them strengthened. not specific gun laws but, you know, saying we need to reinstitute the assault weapons ban and fix it. guest: well, the evidence -- again, we are certainly willing to listen to proposals that are offered by the president and his commission and by others, but the original assault weapons ban was not a meaningful law because it did not distinguish between the so-called assault weapon and other types of firearms that fir
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8